Wall Street: Money never sleeps

Wall Street: Money never sleeps

           Wall Street: Money never sleeps
               Genre: Drama
               Financial crisis, Sequel, murder, prison, Wall Street, greed, brokers, Cannes 2010
  Bubbles, so eagerly awaited sequel raises Oliver Stone to make his movie Wall Street in 1987, there was always. Long before the current upheavals in the financial sector, before the Internet bubble, which at the turn of the millennium around destroyed billions of dollars, there was speculation and hype, as the Dutch tulip mania of the 17th Century, on 7 February 1637 burst. No wonder then that Gordon Gekko, the Stone-established in the late 1980s as the epitome of unscrupulous speculators, hanging in his New York loft a pictorial representation of that first documented in the bladder wall has. Whether this, however, as a warning or as an expression of incorrigible, a notorious fraudster is to be understood, we can think about it a long time. The movie begins with Gekko released from prison, which ensures equal for the first laugh: When the market players handed his belongings get, is among them other than a money clip (“without money”, as the responsible officials stressed) a phone that looks against today’s smartphones, such as a relic from the Stone Age telecommunicative – a huge bone with the dusty charm of the late 1980s. A first gag that suggests that Stone, despite the seriousness of his concern quite willing to repeatedly refer to his work from 1987, when as a continuation Wall Street: Money does not sleep now compete. To make it short: The cameos by Charlie Sheen as Bud Fox and his own cameo Stones are the few really charming places of a work which is good as a comment on the financial crisis almost as little as a truly immersive entertainment cinema. Released from jail Gekko succeeded with his book, which is the provocative question “Is greed good?” represents, in the talk shows and in readings and gives the impression, as did in fact by his enforced break something changed in his thinking principle. For his transformation from a ruthless critic of the financial investor to purified the gradual approach speaks to his daughter Winnie (Carey Mulligan), which is initiated by the fiance Jacob Moore (Shia LaBeouf), an ambitious Wall Street banker with a green heart. The banking world, which Stone traces is advised abundant simple: in addition to black sheep and idealists, like Jacob, there are no shadows and no gradations – Stones moral standards to know is still only the distinction between “good” and “evil”, “brave” and “degenerate”. Even though the Gekko have changed, Stone has remained true in this case as before. What also his undoubted qualities, but also his greatest flaw as a filmmaker aptly describes. Jacob and his spiritual mentor and mentor Louis Zabel (Frank Langella) belong in this black and white world of course is the “good” guys, but in the shark tank of the financial world is no place for such types. While Zabel by rumors and rigging in the ruin and is finally driven to suicide, attempted Moore to get involved in the game of the great jugglers and drive especially the crafty investment banker Bretton James into a corner – what, finally, thanks to the free press (remarkable that this is the site of his girlfriend Winnie and not print institutions like the New York Times) succeed. What Jacob did not calculate is precisely one’s own father-in-law. Because contrary to the prima facie Gekko is still in the game and not afraid afraid to put his own daughter financially to your back. But Gekko his soft spot and the long period of reflection has yet may have caused a rethink in him. As the analysis of the financial crisis has Wall Street: Money can not hardly sleep or even something new to tell relevant and is remarkably simple explanations for the systemic shocks of the world financial system. The imbalance in the global economy as a result of the games omnipotent “masters of the universe,” take no responsibility for their actions, was in the last few months, so often part of comments and analysis that one would wish, at least in the cinema would be a reflection some go further. Perhaps the avowed patriot and conservative values “left” Oliver Stone is the wrong man for an informed critique of the financial system and its foundations – he may simply human, the Menschelnde too much. The fact that the equally wily as unscrupulous financial juggler Gekko in the end heart shows and promotes the good thing is, Oliver Stone, of course, have only one reason: who gets how Gekko promised to be grandpa, who must, of course, from Saul to Paul change. Oh, if the world were so simple. (Joachim Kurz)
  Title: Wall Street: Money does not sleep Original Title: Wall Street 2: Money Never Sleeps Country of production: USA Production year: 2010 Distribution: Twentieth Century Fox

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