The life that I always wanted

The life that I always wanted

The life that I always wanted

  There is no question that love in all its splendor, all its limitations and promises of the great theme of the Italian director Giuseppe Piccioni. Whether in Not of this World / Fuori dal Mondo (1999) or in light of my eyes / Luce dei miei occhi (2001) or in his new film The life that I ever wanted / La vita che vorrei, always breathe the spirit of the films Romanticism and act on their emotion and their penchant for melodrama for the Nordic viewer almost bombastic. In his latest film, Piccioni, but also creates a radical and intriguing analysis of poverty in our bond and relationship failure, despite all the bitterness provides a hopeful end – at least for those who enjoy being involved with it.

If the cast samples at a opulent history of ham, in the 18th Century plays to come near the young, aspiring actress Laura (Sandra Ceccarelli), and their already-established colleague, Stefano (Luigi Lo Cascio). All the better that Laura finally gets the role of Stefanos side, because the two are not only a dream couple, but also more affectionate. But the balance between film and reality, played true feelings and emotions is not easy, and soon Laura and Stefano not know in what moments they just play and in what they are really what they represent. Especially Stefano is more than confused, because Laura’s passion can ignite not only his heart but rapture the whole team. And so it goes back and forth between the two until they finally reach the point where they must decide whether they want to give her love in real life a chance, or whether this is impossible …

Parallel Giuseppe Piccioni tells two love stories from different centuries, a real (or maybe not?), the other fictional or not. And the startling, because amazingly simple trick gives the movie exactly the kind of rotation to be the preserve him from being dismissed as another love story, and quickly forgotten. What is surprising is especially Piccionis recognition that in the past but prudish and misprint, but compared to today, even more honest and authentic happened, when emotions come into play. What remains is the knowledge that while formerly all – or at least, the courtship was dealt with – much easier than in our times, but the way life will be held today and must therefore also in the present. Not bad, once said to get the back – especially in such a charming and inspiring, but sometimes a bit long-winded way. A film for romantics, if there is any left.

(Joachim Kurz)

Title: The life that I always wanted Original Title: La vita che vorrei Country of production: Italy Year of production: 2004 (# ) Length: 125 (Min) of material: Black & White Film Distribution

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