Solino

Solino

Solino

  In the sixties, leaving the family Amato their sunny home village Solino Apulia in southern Italy and emigrated to Duisburg. In the bleak industrial landscape of the Ruhr area, they set to work to conjure up some Mediterranean joy of the working day, and with the help of the first pizzeria in the city, which will bring the guys closer to the sweet life. Above all, the father of the family, Romano (Gigi Savoia) goes into full on his role as restaurant owners and Latin Lover, while suffering from his wife, Rosa (Antonella Attili) increasing from homesickness and the escapades of her husband. Also, the two sons of the family have their problems, Gigi (Barnaby Metschurat) and Giancarlo (Moritz Bleibtreu) fall in love with the same girl. Over the years the family has always lived apart, until finally returning Rosa summarizes the lonely decision after Solino. And the brothers Guido and Giancarlo soon go their separate ways, one of the two will compete together with his mother, the long way home.

Some critics did not know Fatih Akin’s film about an Italian family in Germany to convince the extent of how it had been in short and painless, and in July the case. And they certainly did not Solino the sparse roughness and authenticity of his sensational debut or the Berlinale-winner against the wall. Nevertheless Solino still stands far above other film discussions about guest workers, it shows the problems and the various forms to cope with life in a foreign land, without raising the moral high and the difficulties put too much into the center of attention . For in the first place Solino is a bittersweet melancholy portrait of a family that fails. Although Akin spares no Gefühlsirrungen and wirrungen he sailed confidently too much kitsch and presents an opulent, German-Italian family saga, which accurately captures the zeitgeist of the sixties and seventies.

Title: Solino Country of production: Germany, Italy Year of production: 2002 Length: 124 (Min)

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