Route Irish

Route Irish

           Route Irish
               Genre: Drama
               Death, Liverpool, Iraq war, intrigue, soldier, Baghdad, Cannes 2010, Security
  While other old masters such as Woody Allen, this year in Cannes rather tired presented, showing the British filmmaker Ken Loach, that he maintains is still his own special kind of political cinema that his films will make a difference, that they shake and grievances show want. For his new film, Route Irish, where it will focus on the opaque business of private security companies in Iraq and Afghanistan, he has – unusually enough for the master of Sozialdramas – chosen the form of a thriller. Fergus Malloy (Mark Womack) has served as a soldier in Iraq first and then hired the private security firm Haynes. Now he returns home to Liverpool, where his best friend Frankie (John Bishop), who also served with Haynes is to be buried – he was on “Route Irish,” the most dangerous road in the world, from the Baghdad airport in the Green Zone in the city center, leads in an ambush by terrorists and was killed. But Fergus quickly suspects that the official version of something is not right – especially when an Iraqi mobile phone shows up, that shows how employees of Haynes take a taxi full of civilians in Iraq under fire and extinguish it a whole family. Together with Frankies widow Rachel (Andrea Lowe), he knows too long (and loves), sets out Fergus, the true background of death to pursue his best friend and ends up even in the firing line of his colleagues. Although Route Irish by the war in Iraq explains, he plays almost exclusively in Liverpool – apart from some central flashback, shot in Jordan. Loach’s attached to it message is as clear as that of Oren Mover Mans soon tarnish drama, The Messenger, which also tells of the war in Iraq, but only in the U.S. play – the conflict that we believe in the distant future, has long since arrived on our doorstep he produces soldiers who can get along with the experienced not fighting machines, which are due to the brutality to rein in fact little more. Fergus Malloy is one of those broken men – such as the ruthless mercenaries who fought it distinguishes him almost nothing of his enemies. The fact that he fights with all means for the good thing is, only his close relationship with Frankie (and his love for Rachel to thank for). This makes him not necessarily sympathetic, but all the more believable character, a choleric, who has only very rarely in his barren apartment and told much of his inner emptiness and homelessness. And it is more than logical that this man who without any scruples kills even innocent people can be granted at the end not a happy outcome. However, Route Irish is not one of the best films of Ken Loach – that recalls the work but then too much of many now prominent British TV thriller. What shows are on what a high level of these productions is now reached at least in part, and how much they accept always current and controversial topics, such as that of the Iraq war. Man missing in this story a little the grand gesture and the great pictures that would distinguish the film from the competition on television. (Joachim Kurz)
  Title: Route Irish Country of production: France, Great Britain Year of Production: 2010 Length: 109 (Min.)

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