Paradise Now

Paradise Now

Paradise Now

  Khaled (Ali Suliman) and Said (Kais Nashef) have known each other for ages. Her life in Nablus in the West Bank runs without major ups and downs, they work part in a run down garage and make the few illusions about their future. Nevertheless, everything seems to be in good order, especially for Said, who has his eye on Suha (Lubna Azabal), the daughter of a freedom fighter killed as martyrs. But to be chosen as one of the two Palestinian militiamen to jointly carry out a bomb attack in Tel Aviv, has the relatively quiet life to an end. Bang on the case say the two have very naive young men are a “sacred mission” of the body and allowed it to anyone. The last night with the family and therefore it runs restless, so Saïd rediscovers at four in the morning before Suhas house and is invited to a tea.

But however great the confusion of the two martyrs-in-law is also now there is no way back. In the hideout of the terrorists, the two shaved, placed in inconspicuous clothing and equipped with the explosives belt. After the mandatory recording of a video message of the martial fatherly chief terrorist, Jamal (Amer Hlehel brings), the two most even to the border and send them to certain death. But as so often this does not happen as planned because the two lovebirds have to flee and seek each other from now on in despair. The longer they wander, the more absurd the whole situation, especially as they realize over time how little they are behind the noble objectives of the other fighters. But it returns for the two one way out of the cycle of retaliatory violence?

Paradise Now by Hany Abu-Assad is a bitter and tragic-comic parable about the Middle East conflict, which the viewer in a constant state of suspension between hope and fear, horror and delight, horror and pleasure can be – and all this without condemning the attitude of one or the other, or to glorify. Brief and full of love for detail, the two bombers against their will appear as a powerful symbolic figures for all parties to the conflict, although they know that their actions is absurd and pointless, but are just sort of slipped into the fatal mechanisms and try kicking now, it to liberate.

A real highlight of this year’s Berlinale, and a powerful political statement on the Middle East conflict that has simultaneously nachregt think. Definitely one of the most important films of this year.

Title: Paradise Now Country of production: France, Netherlands, Palestine Year of production: 2005 Length: 90 (Min) (# ) Distribution: Constantine

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