Moon

Moon

           Moon
               Genre: Thriller, Science Fiction
               Robots, solitude, moon, space station, Fantasy Filmfest 2009
  For nearly three years, is Sam Bell (Sam Rockwell) in the service of Lunar Industries Ltd. Selene on the Moon base and then monitored the mechanical removal of the gas helium-3, with the help of some seventy percent of the energy of the earth will be covered. There is not much to do, fully automatic harvesting machines plow the lunar soil and thus gain the valuable energy source, which is then shot with the aid of a shuttle transport to the earth. For Sam, the whole is a boring routine job, by the glamor of the space is hardly something to be stayed, what you see already on the spacesuit of the space worker. Instead of bright white spots are found everywhere and visible traces of numerous maintenance and repair operations. The loneliness that is spoken only broken by occasional contact with the earth and talks to the computer Gerty (Kevin Spacey) is gnawing at the psyche of Sam, who works at the beginning of the film rather neglected. Now, Sam’s time tends slowly to the moon to end in two weeks he will return to Earth, where his wife and daughter, with whom he has an occasional visual and voice contact, are already waiting anxiously for him. But shortly before the return journey to strange occurrences begin to accumulate. And then Sam has a strange accident at a outdoor consequently, his suspicions that something goes wrong on Selene to condense more and more a terrible certainty. For his life has long since taken a different turn when he finds it, he has become a game ball, which is not much more than a slave in the obscure machinations of Lunar Industries … While currently dominate futuristic shooter orgies like Transformers – Revenge of the canvases, forms probably the greatest Moon opposite pole of the genre within science fiction. With a skeleton crew, the driving music by Clint Mansell and a sophisticated story that puts an emphasis on the psychological aspects of loneliness and isolation as well as a devilish twist, which gives the whole a deeply philosophical dimension that drives Duncan Jones’s movie progressing cautiously and remains gripping to the last. The sterile, brightly lit rooms of the moon station, the voice of the computer that can control a mobile manipulator which approaches Sam several times quickly from the back, the emoticons on the screen of Gerty, which should express the “feelings” of the computer and over a leave doubt as to whether he “honestly” thinks (too well the subtle little games in my memory, which once played in Stanley Kubrick’s HAL 9000 in 2001 with the astronauts) are – all that creates a subtle atmosphere of threat that can be felt rather than just name can be materialized in a weird way, driving a subtle confusion. Finally, Sam looks in the literal sense confronted with himself and all that he had been sure of itself, is becoming increasingly fragile, until finally he must know the whole truth about his own existence. Who am I? What makes me as a person? Can I rely on all the things that strikes me as a matter of course? What is the meaning of my life? There are fundamental questions and uncertainties such as these, the Moon is not just an extraordinary science fiction movie, but also a profound reflection on appearance and (as his), make identity and reproducibility. And while the film goes even further, analyzed and, almost incidentally, in passing the fatal mechanism of economic thought, the man perhaps understands more than human capital. The truly shocking thing in mind: The roots of such an inhumane work are already in the Here and Now firmly established, the story is told Moon that is thus only a logical extension of that we observe today was already able to. , Duncan Jones’ feature film debut is a stunning mature work, which has, despite its meager cast in an intelligent manner and lasting effect. Long, much too long could be seen in the science fiction genre nothing even remotely comparable. Perhaps – and this is long overdue – it succeeds Moon, too, all those science fiction fans to lure back into the cinemas, who out of frustration about the senseless slaughter and material effect orgies of the last years of the cinema with his back. (Joachim Kurz)
  Title: Moon Country of production: United Kingdom Production year: 2009 Length: 97 (Min.) Distribution: (# ) Koch Media / 24 Images

Related posts