Lebanon

Lebanon

           Lebanon
               Genre: Drama, War Film
               Soldiers, Lebanon, Israel, Venice, 2009, Panzer
  A trip to St. Tropez – that sounds like frivolous fun, like summer, red wine and the scent of sunscreen, for pure joy. From all this, in Samuel Maoz ‘Film Lebanon is to feel nothing – quite the contrary. What really can hardly surprising, for after leading the drive to St. Tropez is not here the seductive Cote d’Azur, but into the midst of the already mentioned in the title of Lebanon. The year 1982 has just begun the Lebanon campaign. Maoz four young tank crew sends in the belly of a steel monster on the trip: Asi (Itay Tiran) is the commander of the monster, Yigal (Michael Moshonov), the driver, Shmulik (Yoav Donat), the gunner and Hertzel (Osri Cohen), the gunner. In confined spaces and crowded with a very limited view of the outside (the camera dwells exclusively in the tank or shows from the outside world only what is seen, the four young men through their vision equipment), the war for the inexperienced soldiers, so far only have played on the training ground war to a border experience. Led by Gamil (Zohar Strauss), who with his paratroopers (in radio communication “Cinderella” called) the “Rhinoceros” (so the code word for the tank) accompanies and his orders from the headquarters (code name “Cornelia”) is replaced, it was quickly given the first “angel” (so the code word for a fallen soldier to sign). And because in the chaos of the war for the time being no ambulance available, it must be deposited in the body armor. As soon as the angel is gone but then by helicopter to the sky (which shows the filmmaker literally), this will be replaced by a captured Syrian soldiers. At least now it dawns Jamil and his subordinates that it has apparently proceed properly. For on the road to St. Tropez was not really counted on the presence of the Syrians. Disoriented and literally become muddled situation, the strain of the rescue is the most dangerous situation more than uncertain. Moreover, even allies like the Christian Phalange appear untrustworthy. Who can be trusted in this mess at all? From the promised walk to St. Tropez is a hell ride into the dark heart of the war has become. And even if such a field of sunflowers in full (and mildly) ends – who has seen what these four men had to watch that will shape the experience for a lifetime. has Thanks to the consistency with which Samuel Maoz presents this apocalyptic fierce drive and equipped exclusively within the carapace, with occasional views of the chaotic outside world, the fear of death, the confusion and the failure of the young soldiers for the audience not only understandable, but almost physically tangible. We sit with them in their vehicle to see only what they see (and this is terribly low, and if either of painful agonizing brutality or ambiguous), we may just as they get out of this steel prison. With her (and our) view through the scope everything falls into sight, everything is aimed at victims – mostly herself with Lebanon is Samuel Maoz managed an amazing film – in some moments reminds anti-war drama, not least because of the blurred faces in the dark belly of the tank to Francis Ford Coppola’s Apocalypse Now, again due to the spatial limitation and restriction to Wolfgang Petersen’s Das Boot. In principle, drives Maoz the film by German director further to the extreme, in comparison to the true cramped but very large space in a U-boat that resembles the work of four Israeli soldiers, a rolling coffin – who also goes on strike again and again and refuse service. After the Berlinale competition entry Beaufort and Waltz with Bashir is now Lebanon, the third cinematic examination of an Israeli director of the Lebanon war. It falls to two in particular: First, none of the films, the Lebanon-Israeli policy is itself in question and the second covering at least two of the films (namely, Waltz with Bashir and Lebanon) to the far-off campaign of 1982. It almost seems as if the Israeli film are only at the beginning of a long journey, during which memories have slowly forgetting and repression are rescued before you come to the core problems and solutions associated with it may be too. Serve with a further similarity between Waltz with Bashir and Lebanon: In two stories are the Israeli soldiers more victims than perpetrators, projected cruelty and brutality are mainly Christian Phalange militia and, while the fighters have to endure their own suffering and, above all. One approach that can be quite critical, as it’s own responsibility in the war largely hides. What may lie both in Samuel Maoz as with Ari Folman (Waltz with Bashir) because both films are based on his own war experiences – here comes the critical gaze on his person to the blind spot of observation. But as I said: Probably this is only the beginning of a long cinematic as social process. At the 66th International Film Festival in Venice the Golden Lion award (where the film asserted, inter alia, Fatih Akin’s Soul Kitchen and Jessica Hauser Lourdes) is a German distributor for Lebanon so far, unfortunately, still not fixed. At the festivals, where he was to see so far, but Lebanon has been received with much interest and caused lively discussions. It would be nice if this film would remain under discussion. (Joachim Kurz)
  Title: Lebanon Original Title: Levanon Country of production: Germany, France, Israel Year of Production: 2009 Length: (# ) 90 (Min.) Distribution: Senator Film Distribution

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